Blog

The health system in Botswana for tourists

Botswana provides free or heavily-subsidised primary healthcare to all of its citizens, and private healthcare is also available. An extensive network of public hospitals and clinics operate across the country and there are two private hospitals in Gaborone. Even in the most remote areas there’s likely to be a government-run medical facility of some kind […]

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Medical emergencies while travelling through Botswana

Botswana has countrywide, toll-free numbers for ambulance (997), police (999), fire brigade (998) and medical rescue services (911). For air rescue and serious injury, you can also contact various private medical companies for assistance. Medical Rescue International (MRI) is well known, and can be reached 24-hours, 7-days-a-week on 992 (toll-free) or +267-390-1601. Emergency Assist 991 […]

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Cultural practices of Botswana

As in any culture, a few words of the local language go a long way to making friends. Setswana is the first language of over three quarters of the population and you can’t go wrong with a ‘dumêla’ (hello) or ‘dumelang’ (how are you?). Botswanans are generally laid-back and gregarious. Take the time to say […]

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Clothing and washing on your trip to Botswana

There are no laundry facilities outside the major towns, so pack clothing that doesn’t show the dirt. There’s a reason safari outfits are all shades of khaki! You can take a small bucket and biological washing powder to do laundry on the road, but it’s also a good idea to schedule a stop in Maun […]

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Road rules and guide to Botswana

Botswana’s traffic police enforce speed limits through radar trapping. They use mobile units and tend to set up just after villages or vet fence gates – anywhere where the highway speed limit (usually 120km/h) has been lowered and not yet re-established. If you do get stopped for speeding, you can expect a spot fine. Fines […]

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Park guide in Botswana

There are very few officials in any of Botswana’s parks. Visitors are expected to look after themselves and obey the rules. Park rules are simple: leave before 11am on your day of departure, don’t drive more than 40km/h, keep to the main tracks and don’t remove any fauna or flora. You can usually pay your […]

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Camp guide in Botswana

The most important thing to know about Botswana’s camps is that they’re unfenced and wild animals are free to wander through them without restriction. The rules are few and simple: don’t play music, don’t sleep in the open, don’t leave your tent or vehicle at night, camp only at your designated campsite, and secure your […]

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Border crossing in Botswana

Border crossings between Botswana and South Africa or Namibia are usually straight-forward and hassle free. You’ll need to have some cash for road and vehicle taxes – a few hundred pula or rands – and your vehicle’s papers must be in order. You’ll need a certified copy of the registration papers and a letter from […]

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Two weeks in Botswana

Two weeks is just enough time to do the classic Botswana circuit and see the pans, the Central Kalahari, Moremi and Chobe. ![enter image description here](https://www.drivesouthafrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/drive-south-africa-central-kalahari-road-trip.jpg) From Johannesburg, you can drive into Botswana from the southeast and stop over at Khama Rhino Sanctuary before heading up to Lekhubu Island. From there, either cross the Makgadikgadi […]

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A week in Botswana

If you only have a week in Botswana, then base yourself out of Maun or Kasane and explore from there. From Kasane you can venture into the northern reaches of Chobe National Park for a few days, then book a boat cruise or fishing trip from one of the many operators in town. Victoria Falls […]

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